City of Enid pushes ahead with planned 70-mile Kaw Lake water line

The City of Enid is still attempting to negotiate with landowners as it plans to build a 70-mile water line from Kaw Lake to a treatment facility in Enid.

The City Commission recently received an update on the project. The negotiations are for 225 parcels of land in Garfield, Noble, Osage and Kay counties.  About 59 percent of the landowners have not yet been notified according to Michael Graves, senior vice president of Garver, the program management and lead design consultant and Chris Gdanski, director of engineering for the City of Enid.

Highlights of the report include:

  • The City of Enid is negotiating easements and right of ways along the pipeline route.  Smith Roberts Land Service is talking to the landowners on behalf of the City of Enid to acquire easement access on approximately 225 parcels of land in four counties: Garfield, Noble, Osage and Kay.  Landowners have been receiving letters of notice if the pipeline is planned to cross or impact their property. About 59 percent of landowners have not yet been notified, but will be contacted soon.
  • Renderings were presented to show the intake structures on the southwest shore of Kaw Lake.  The City of Enid has taken steps in the design and engineering of the small structures to hide them in the uneven topography of the lake shore so that the view and enjoyment of Kaw Lake is not interrupted.  “The City of Enid directed our firm to design the structures in a way that preserves the view, access and enjoyment of the lake for neighbors and lake visitors.  It was important to the City that they be a good neighbor and preserve all uses of the lake.  We have maintained the uninterrupted view of the beautiful lake and shore,” says Michael Graves of Garver.
  • The City of Enid contacted pipeline manufacturers to understand the lead time needed for pipe fabrication and the stability of steel prices.  The three steel manufacturers in the United States reported price stability anticipated through the end of 2019 and estimated the manufacturing lead time they need would be 10 weeks or less.  “This is great news because we are scrutinizing costs and details to ensure the project stays on budget and the steel pipe represents a very large chunk of the project cost.  We don’t control the price of steel and we were concerned about price volatility.   Based on when we will need to order, we can be confident in the stability of price estimates,” said Chris Gdanski.
  • To understand what 70 miles of steel pipeline would look like, a Garver engineer calculated it would weigh almost 37 million pounds and equal 615,000 bushels of wheat or 57,706 sheets of ¼ inch plywood.
  • The project management team presented a construction-manager-at-risk (CMAR) alternate delivery method to reduce financial uncertainty and control costs associated with the project.  The current approach considered is a design, bid, build method that includes hiring multiple final design consultants. The CMAR method would allow an independent cost opinion at the 30 percent design phase now.  Further, the CMAR method would allow for a contractor team to work with the design team and give a guaranteed maximum price at 60 percent.  The total project cost could increase by approximately 1 percent, but with the transfer of project cost risk to the CMAR and the ability to negotiate.
  • The project is on schedule and on budget.

About the Kaw Lake Water Supply program

The City of Enid is building a 70-mile pipeline to carry water from Kaw Lake to a new water treatment plant on the city’s west side.  The pipeline will have a capacity of 10.5M gallons of water a day.  The project was approved by Enid voters in August 2016 by more than 68 percent and includes the 70-mile pipeline, intake structures at Kaw Lake and a water treatment plant on the city’s west side.  Well levels have diminished by more than half in less than 20 years and it’s projected that Enid will have water shortages in the future without this project.  The Kaw Lake water project secures ample water supply for at least the next 50 years and allows room for growth and economic development for Enid and the surrounding area.  The project is estimated to be complete in 2023 at a cost of $315M.

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Bill Shewey, Mayor

Ron Janzen, Ward 1

Derwin Norwood, Ward 2

Ben Ezzell, Ward 3

Jonathan Waddell, Ward 4

Tammy Wilson, Ward 5

George Pankonin, Ward 6

Jerald Gilbert, City Manager

Steve Kime, Media Contact

(580) 616-7258

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